THE BEST & WORST SLEEPING POSITIONS (INFOGRAPHIC)

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THE BEST & WORST SLEEPING POSITIONS (INFOGRAPHIC)

Sleep is a tricky subject. How much should you get? Is it better to sleep on your side or on your stomach? What position makes you more likely to snore?

Thankfully, The Huffington Post put together an infographic detailing the pros and cons of each sleep position. So pay close attention to the tips below!

What’s your favorite way to sleep? Let us know!

Source: HuffPost

Eat That Frog : Six “P” formula

You may have heard of the six “P” formula. It says,

“Proper Prior Planning Prevents Poor Performance.”

I have found a simple truth. The ability to concentrate single-mindedly on your most important task, to do it well and to finish it completely, is the key to great success, achievement, respect, status and happiness in life.

(Moon+ Reader Pro v2.3.2, Eat That Frog)

Posted from WordPress for Android By Shashi Kumar Aansoo

When Procrastination Is a Problem, and How to Fix It

Procrastination is a long word for this quick idea: later.  It’s telling yourself you’ll do things “tomorrow” or “when I feel more like it.”

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Kill The Habits of Procrastinating When Procrastination Is a Problem.

When is putting things off a problem?

Everyone delays or puts things off sometimes, and that’s fine, says Timothy Pychyl, PhD, an associate professor of psychology at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. You might postpone a meeting because of a schedule conflict, or to give yourself time to prepare. Procrastinating becomes a problem only when it hinders your relationships or getting your work done.

For about one in five adults, procrastination is a real, long-lasting problem.

Why we delay

The things people put off tend to be boring, hard, time-consuming, or maybe they lack meaning to us. Or we worry that the results won’t be perfect. When you avoid doing what seems less than pleasant, you get a little mood boost. But this bump doesn’t last. The avoided thing still hangs over you, causing guilt and stress.

The real reasons we procrastinate lie deep within human behavior. We tend to view things in the future as less real or concrete. The later risks of not doing something (or the rewards of getting it done) seem less real, too.

Putting things off is a habit. We’re wired to do what’s easy — in this case, delaying doing something we don’t find pleasant. And habits are hard to break.

How to get a move on

1. Be concrete. Don’t say, “I’ll start the report in the morning.” Say, “I’ll outline just the three main points of the report while I drink my morning coffee, before I look at mail.”

2. Be realistic about your time. We tend to be optimists about the future and think we’ll get more done than we do. Try jotting down all the things you have to do into your datebook. Include tasks like shopping for food, doing laundry, working out. That way when you make a plan to do something, you can get a true sense of what time you’ll have.

3. “Pre-empt that which tempts,” Pychyl says. Shut off all the things that are a click away from distracting you. Social media and texting require little effort, give you a lot of mood reward, and suck time. Make them a reward after you finish.

4. Know and accept that when the time comes to do the task, you won’t want to — and get past that. Just starting, even in the smallest way, creates progress. Then a sense of progress fuels well-being. “It’s an upward spiral,” Pychyl says.

5. Start with the hardest tasks. Willpower is a muscle. You’ll better resist things that distract when you first get started.

6. “Time travel” in your mind’s eye to when the task at hand is done. Think about how good you’ll feel.
Pace yourself. Set aside time to make a little progress every day. College students who had to complete small amounts of work before they could go to the next level did better on tests than those who were given all the study material at once, a 2011 University of Kansas study found.

7. Be kind to yourself.  Praise yourself for taking the first steps. Assure yourself that a “good enough” effort is great, and better than putting things off.

Posted from WordPress for Android By Shashi Kumar Aansoo

Fact you must know About Vitamin ‘D’

Vitamin D does not get enough attention, which may explain why a massive 50 – 90% of us are thought to have a deficiency. Vitamin D is acquired through contact with sunlight, consuming vitamin rich foods such as eggs, mushrooms and fish, and supplements to aid our bodies to regulate calcium absorption.

Vitamin D is also thought to be involved in our immune systems and to play roles in multiple types of diseases.

Babies require 400IU of vitamin D, adults 600IU whilst those aged over 50 and pregnant women need a massive 800IU. The ideal way for us to take in Vitamin D would be 90% through sunlight and 10% through food, or an equal 30% to food, sunlight and supplements. However, we actually gain the vitamin via sunlight just 10% of the time, 20% through food, and 20% via supplements, leaving 40% of insufficiency. This insufficiency can lead to headaches, pain, muscle weakness and can ultimately lead to very serious health issues.

Vitamin D is important! Why not get out in the sun and/ or eat some vitamin D rich foods today, and feel healthier!

Vitamin D More Than Just A Vitamin

Thanks & Regards,
Shashi Kumar Aansoo
Author of #InspiringShashi Blog

Living The Best Today

सौजन्य:
“Everything You Need To Know About Vitamin D” http://feedly.com/k/1dFhmpD

The top 10 languages spoken in the world

10. French — Number of speakers: 129 million
Often called the most romantic language in the world, French is spoken in tons of countries, including Belgium, Canada, Rwanda, Cameroon, and Haiti. Oh, and France too. We’re actually very lucky that French is so popular, because without it, we might have been stuck with Dutch Toast, Dutch Fries, and Dutch kissing (ew!).
To say “hello” in French, say “Bonjour” (bone-JOOR).

9. Malay-Indonesian Number of speakers: 159 million
Malay-Indonesian is spoken – surprise – in Malaysia and Indonesia. Actually, we kinda fudged the numbers on this one because there are many dialects of Malay, the most popular of which is Indonesian. But they’re all pretty much based on the same root language, which makes it the ninth most-spoken in the world.Indonesia is a fascinating place; a nation made up of over 13,000 islands it is the sixth most populated country in the world. Malaysia borders on two of the larger parts of Indonesia (including the island of Borneo), and is mostly known for its capital city of Kuala Lumpur.
To say “hello” in Indonesian, say “Selamat pagi” (se-LA-maht PA-gee).

8. Portuguese — Number of speakers: 191 million
Think of Portuguese as the little language that could. In the 12th Century, Portugal won its independence from Spain and expanded all over the world with the help of its famous explorers like Vasco da Gama and Prince Henry the Navigator. (Good thing Henry became a navigator . . . could you imagine if a guy named “Prince Henry the Navigator” became a florist?) Because Portugal got in so early on the exploring game, the language established itself all over the world, especially in Brazil (where it’s the national language), Macau, Angola, Venezuela, and Mozambique.
To say “hello” in Portuguese, say “Bom dia” (bohn DEE-ah).

7. Bengali — Number of speakers: 211 million
In Bangladesh, a country of 120+ million people, just about everybody speaks Bengali. And because Bangladesh is virtually surrounded by India (where the population is growing so fast, just breathing the air can get you pregnant), the number of Bengali speakers in the world is much higher than most people would expect.
To say “hello” in Bengali, say “Ei Je” (EYE-jay).

6. Arabic — Number of speakers: 246 million
Arabic, one of the world’s oldest languages, is spoken in the Middle East, with speakers found in countries such as Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Iraq, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, and Egypt. Furthermore, because Arabic is the language of the Koran, millions of Moslems in other countries speak Arabic as well. So many people have a working knowledge of Arabic, in fact, that in 1974 it was made the sixth official language of the United Nations.
To say “hello” in Arabic, say “Al salaam a’alaykum” (Ahl sah-LAHM ah ah-LAY-koom) .

5. Russian — Number of speakers: 277 million
Mikhail Gorbachev, Boris Yeltsin, and Yakov Smirnoff are among the millions of Russian speakers out there. Sure, we used to think of them as our Commie enemies. Now we think of them as our Commie friends. One of the six languages in the UN, Russian is spoken not only in the Mother Country, but also in Belarus, Kazakhstan, and the U.S. (to name just a few places).
To say “hello” in Russian, say “Zdravstvuite” (ZDRAST-vet- yah).

4. Spanish — Number of speakers: 392 million
Aside from all of those kids who take it in high school, Spanish is spoken in just about every South American and Central American country, not to mention Spain, Cuba, and the U.S. There is a particular interest in Spanish in the U.S., as many English words are borrowed from the language, including: tornado, bonanza, patio, quesadilla, enchilada, and taco grande supreme.
To say “hello” in Spanish, say “Hola” (OH-la).

3. Hindustani — Number of speakers: 497 million
Hindustani is the primary language of India’s crowded population, and it encompasses a huge number of dialects (of which the most commonly spoken is Hindi). While many predict that the population of India will soon surpass that of China, the prominence of English in India prevents Hindustani from surpassing the most popular language in the world. If you’re interested in learning a little Hindi, there’s a very easy way: rent an Indian movie. The film industry in India is the most prolific in the world, making thousands of action/romance/ musicals every year.
To say “hello” in Hindustani, say “Namaste” (Nah-MAH-stay) .

2. English — Number of speakers: 508 million
While English doesn’t have the most speakers, it is the official language of more countries than any other language. Its speakers hail from all around the world, including the U.S., Australia, England, Zimbabwe, the Caribbean, Hong Kong, South Africa, and Canada. We’d tell you more about English, but you probably feel pretty comfortable with the language already. Let’s just move on to the most popular language in the world.
To say “hello” in English, say “What’s up, freak?” (watz-UP-freek) .

1. Mandarin — Number of speakers: 1 billion+
Surprise, surprise, the most widely spoken language on the planet is based in the most populated country on the planet, China. Beating second-place English by a 2 to 1 ratio, but don’t let that lull you into thinking that Mandarin is easy to learn.. Speaking Mandarin can be really tough, because each word can be pronounced in four ways (or “tones”), and a beginner will invariably have trouble distinguishing one tone from another. But if over a billion people could do it, so could you. Try saying hello!
To say “hello” in Mandarin, say “Ni hao” (Nee HaOW). (“Hao” is pronounced as one syllable, but the tone requires that you let your voice drop midway, and then raise it again at the end.)



Word Power Made Easy – I Started Working on it.

After long waiting finaly I purchased and start working it.

My Initial Test is Really Below Average . I need perfect attention and routine and have to stick on that.

I Just Want To Better Control On English.

Create a total life

So, how do you create a total life? Consider the following five key elements

Practice self-development

Self-development is a major theme throughout Drucker’s writings and teachings. “What matters,” he said, “is that the knowledge worker, by the time he or she reaches middle age, has developed and nourished a human being rather than a tax accountant or a hydraulic engineer.” Think about your life, both as it is now and where you’d like to be. Consider not just your work, but also your family, friends, interests, activities, and pursuits. Assess what’s working, what’s not, and what you might want to add or subtract to create more satisfaction and fulfillment.

Identify and develop your unique strengths

The concept of core competencies may have been created for organizations, but today it applies to individuals as well. Drucker urged people to consciously articulate their own strengths. Consider what’s unique about what you do, and in what areas you excel and contribute the most, both at work and outside of work. Focus on those strengths—your own core competencies—and find new ways to value and cultivate them. Odds are you can apply them to a variety of jobs, volunteer positions, and more.

Create a parallel or second career

Drucker said, “The purpose of the work on making the future is not to decide what should be done tomorrow, but what should be done today to have a tomorrow.” One unique idea he advocated was creating a “parallel career” in areas such as teaching, writing, or working in nonprofit organizations. He also encouraged developing a second career, often by doing similar work in a significantly different setting—a lawyer, for instance, might move from a traditional law firm to a legal nonprofit dedicated to a personally meaningful cause. While still in your main job, start thinking about your own possibilities for a parallel or second career. Consider how to match your values, experience, and education, and what shifts you might need to make in your life to support such changes.

Exercise your generosity

An essential part of living in more than one world, Drucker believed, is displaying a sense of generosity. Here, he said, “…everybody is a leader, everybody is responsible, everybody acts.” Sharing your time and talents by getting involved in volunteerism, social entrepreneurship, and mentoring not only provide opportunities to contribute, but also offer personal benefits, from broadening and deepening your life experience to expanding your circle of friends and colleagues. Think about what happens outside your workplace—in other industries, professions, and walks of life—and consider ways you can exercise your own generosity.

Teach and learn

Education plays a key role in Drucker’s vision of a strong, functioning society. He believed that knowledge workers should never stop learning. However, it’s up to them, he said, to incorporate continuous learning as a natural part of daily life— deciding what and how they’d like to learn and determining how they’ll build in the time. Consider your own priorities for learning, as well as how you learn best—taking classes, reading articles and books, asking or observing others, etc. You might also want to teach. As Drucker acknowledged, “No one learns as much as the person who must teach his subject.”

Start Where You Are

Drucker’s tenets can help you create a more satisfying and meaningful personal life and career. Here are seven tips for getting started:

Focus on achievement—not money

Drucker drew an important distinction between achievement and money. He suggested focusing on achievement and paying attention to how your successes, on and off the job, benefit both you and others. That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t or won’t make money, but that the pursuit of money ought to play a subordinate role.

Make time for thinking

Thinking is hard work, and in our fast-paced society, said Drucker, it is sorely devalued. The point, he urged, is to break from the daily grind and think about where you are and where you’re going. You might not have the desire or means

for Drucker’s suggested “week in the wilderness,” but surely you can carve out

an hour now and then for self-reflection. Take a walk, practice yoga or meditation, or enjoy nature.

Practice “systematic abandonment”

“People are effective because they say no…because they say, ‘This isn’t for me,’” declared Drucker. Practice what he called “systematic abandonment”—stepping back, at regular intervals, to determine which of your present activities can be scaled back or eliminated. Only then can you make way for something more fruitful, such as teaching, learning, or volunteering.

Volunteer your time and talent

Drucker saw volunteerism as essential to the smooth functioning of society, as well as a satisfying way of ensuring that work doesn’t consume your life. Today, there are hundreds of volunteering opportunities to choose from. Drucker’s recommendation was simple: Find an organization and cause you believe in—and get to work!

Become a mentor

Mentorship may be broader than just showing someone the ropes in a group or organization. It can include wide-ranging career and life advice, and as Drucker said, provide big benefits not only to the “mentee” but also to the mentor. If you’ve been guided by mentors of your own, pay it forward by mentoring others. If not, look for opportunities to both mentor and be mentored.

Learn the art of leisure

Drucker observed that “loafing” is easy, but “leisure” is difficult. As important as work is, avoid allowing it to be your only source of fulfillment. Find some outside interests; focus on things that may bring you pleasure, satisfaction, and a heightened sense of self-worth.

Be the CEO of your own life

Drucker saw self-management as an ongoing discipline, requiring self-knowledge, introspection, and personal responsibility. “In effect,” he said, “managing oneself demands that each knowledge worker think and behave like a chief executive officer.” Start now to think of yourself as the CEO of your own life and career. Take accountability for your decisions and actions. Know who you are, what is important to you, and how you will contribute at work and in the world.



Finally, take a deep breath and don’t expect everything to happen at once. Start

where you are and move towards your total life, one step at a time.

Thanks for visiting My Blog. Keep Visiting and give your Valuable Comments. Regards, Shashi Kumar Copyright © All rights reserved. http://shashiaansoo.blogspot.com Be Nothing Less Than The Best ™

What Is Respect?

What Is Respect?
Respect means a lot of different things. On a practical level it seems to include taking someone’s feelings, needs, thoughts, ideas, wishes and preferences into consideration. We might also say it means taking all of these seriously and giving them worth and value. In fact, giving someone respect seems similar to valuing them and their thoughts, feelings, etc. It also seems to include acknowledging them, listening to them, being truthful with them, and accepting their individuality and idiosyncrasies.

Thanks for visiting My Blog.
Keep Visiting and give your Valuable Comments.

Regards,

Copyright © All rights reserved.

Great Ways to Become Poor and Stay Poor

20090601-poor

Nobody plans to become poor and yet a great many people end up poor. Here are some of the best known ways of ensuring a life of penury:

1. ‘We don’t need no education…’

If you drop out of school or fail to achieve a basic education then you will severely restrict your chances of employment. What is more it is difficult to acquire further skills if you lack the basic ones. However this method does not guarantee poverty as there are some exceptional people who, because of sheer hard work or innate ability, succeed despite little formal education.

2. Develop an addiction.

Addictions are good ways to squander wealth and health. Cocaine and heroin are fast routes to perdition. Gambling works really well too.. The time-honoured choice is alcoholism which has ruined many a career and relationship. Yet there are exceptions. A tiny number of habitual gamblers win, some alcoholics can function for a long time. In the end the addiction usually wins.

3. Never save.

Savings help build wealth so a good plan for long-term poverty is to blow any extra earnings or bonuses on having a good time.

4. Borrow.

Borrowing to buy a house or get a degree can be an investment but borrowing for vacations, cars and general consumption is not very smart. A good way to beome penniless is to max out your credit cards and keep borrowing more until the repayments overwhelm you.

5. Go directly to jail.

A proven way to avoid success is to get involved in crime, particularly early in life, and end up in jail where you can waste the years that could have been spent acquiring an education and useful skills. Petty criminals find it hard to get jobs, build relationships or retain wealth. Of course some criminals end up rich but they risk being eliminated by rivals.

6. Stay in a dead-end low-paid job.

A low-paid job is fine if you really enjoy what you do or if it is a route to something better. But many people hate what they do and earn barely enough money to survive. They are reluctant to take a risk, to learn new skills or to try something new. They stay on a road that leads nowhere.

7. Avoid work altogether.

Some unfortunate people are too ill to work but many able bodied people make a decision to live on benefits and to avoid work. Perhaps they intend to marry a movie star or to win the lottery but working their way up is not part of the plan.

8. Be born in the third world.

If you are one of the millions born in very poor countries with no human rights, no education or healthcare and a repressive regime then you face enormous difficulties in escaping a life of poverty. Some do but the vast majority are condemned to extreme hardship.

If you are fortunate enough to live in a developed country then you need to avoid plans 1 to 7 above and then maybe do something to help those caught in number 8.

Who’s been India’s best and worst PM till date?

In coming few days, India will have a new Prime Minister. It’s as good a time as any to take stock of the men — and one woman — who have served us. Who’s been the best PM India’s had, and who’s done the most damage?
One Question always arrise that Who’s been India’s best and worst PM till date? According to me. The Failure and achievement we had seen in last decade is enough to decide. No doubt about it If we see our Past it is cristel clear that Mrs Indira Gandhi, Mr Rajiv Gandhi & Mr Atal Bihari Vajpayee remarked a wonderful performance except some of blot. Would that Our country did not faced The 1984 Sikh riots and the Bofors scam, the escorting of three terrorists to Kandahar by Jaswant Singh in exchange for hostage and Gujrat Burned. I think only this four Blot changed lots of thing in our country otherwise both Mr Rajiv Gandhi & Mr Atal Bihari Vajpayee are the best PM ever.
And yes…. Mr Manmohan Singh will be considered as India’s weakest most literate PM not due to his polite and humble nature but because of is appearance towards People I think the people of India never felt connected himself to Mr. PM and this is enough to define.
We do not need this time a Showpiece. Now we do not want to be happy with listing Opening Obama Speech we need such type of Leader in our country and this time it seems there are some like Me Rahul, Mr Advani, and yes Mr Modi is the best.
This is my view and I have right to say

Thanks for visiting My Blog.
Keep Visiting and give your Valuable Comments.
Regards,
Shashi Kumar
Copyright © All rights reserved. http://shashiaansoo.blogspot.com Be Nothing Less Than The Best ™

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

Photoshop contest : To imagine what would be left of some of the world’s major landmarks in hundreds of years, once civilization has ended.

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now
Trafalgar Square, London

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

The Palace of Westminster, London

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

Tower Bridge, London

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

The Burj Al Arab, Dubai

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

Hong Kong harbour

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

Sydney Opera House, Australia

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now
The Louvre, Paris, France

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

The Arc de Triomphe in Paris, France

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

Brandenburg Gate, Berlin, Germany

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

The Basilica of Superga, Turin, Italy

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

Giotto’s bell tower in Florence, Italy

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

Times Square, New York City

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

The Brooklyn Bridge, New York City

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

Cinderella Castle, Walt Disney World, Florida, US

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

Mount Rushmore, South Dakota, US