THE BEST & WORST SLEEPING POSITIONS (INFOGRAPHIC)

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THE BEST & WORST SLEEPING POSITIONS (INFOGRAPHIC)

Sleep is a tricky subject. How much should you get? Is it better to sleep on your side or on your stomach? What position makes you more likely to snore?

Thankfully, The Huffington Post put together an infographic detailing the pros and cons of each sleep position. So pay close attention to the tips below!

What’s your favorite way to sleep? Let us know!

Source: HuffPost

Eat That Frog : Six “P” formula

You may have heard of the six “P” formula. It says,

“Proper Prior Planning Prevents Poor Performance.”

I have found a simple truth. The ability to concentrate single-mindedly on your most important task, to do it well and to finish it completely, is the key to great success, achievement, respect, status and happiness in life.

(Moon+ Reader Pro v2.3.2, Eat That Frog)

Posted from WordPress for Android By Shashi Kumar Aansoo

When Procrastination Is a Problem, and How to Fix It

Procrastination is a long word for this quick idea: later.  It’s telling yourself you’ll do things “tomorrow” or “when I feel more like it.”

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Kill The Habits of Procrastinating When Procrastination Is a Problem.

When is putting things off a problem?

Everyone delays or puts things off sometimes, and that’s fine, says Timothy Pychyl, PhD, an associate professor of psychology at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. You might postpone a meeting because of a schedule conflict, or to give yourself time to prepare. Procrastinating becomes a problem only when it hinders your relationships or getting your work done.

For about one in five adults, procrastination is a real, long-lasting problem.

Why we delay

The things people put off tend to be boring, hard, time-consuming, or maybe they lack meaning to us. Or we worry that the results won’t be perfect. When you avoid doing what seems less than pleasant, you get a little mood boost. But this bump doesn’t last. The avoided thing still hangs over you, causing guilt and stress.

The real reasons we procrastinate lie deep within human behavior. We tend to view things in the future as less real or concrete. The later risks of not doing something (or the rewards of getting it done) seem less real, too.

Putting things off is a habit. We’re wired to do what’s easy — in this case, delaying doing something we don’t find pleasant. And habits are hard to break.

How to get a move on

1. Be concrete. Don’t say, “I’ll start the report in the morning.” Say, “I’ll outline just the three main points of the report while I drink my morning coffee, before I look at mail.”

2. Be realistic about your time. We tend to be optimists about the future and think we’ll get more done than we do. Try jotting down all the things you have to do into your datebook. Include tasks like shopping for food, doing laundry, working out. That way when you make a plan to do something, you can get a true sense of what time you’ll have.

3. “Pre-empt that which tempts,” Pychyl says. Shut off all the things that are a click away from distracting you. Social media and texting require little effort, give you a lot of mood reward, and suck time. Make them a reward after you finish.

4. Know and accept that when the time comes to do the task, you won’t want to — and get past that. Just starting, even in the smallest way, creates progress. Then a sense of progress fuels well-being. “It’s an upward spiral,” Pychyl says.

5. Start with the hardest tasks. Willpower is a muscle. You’ll better resist things that distract when you first get started.

6. “Time travel” in your mind’s eye to when the task at hand is done. Think about how good you’ll feel.
Pace yourself. Set aside time to make a little progress every day. College students who had to complete small amounts of work before they could go to the next level did better on tests than those who were given all the study material at once, a 2011 University of Kansas study found.

7. Be kind to yourself.  Praise yourself for taking the first steps. Assure yourself that a “good enough” effort is great, and better than putting things off.

Posted from WordPress for Android By Shashi Kumar Aansoo

Fact you must know About Vitamin ‘D’

Vitamin D does not get enough attention, which may explain why a massive 50 – 90% of us are thought to have a deficiency. Vitamin D is acquired through contact with sunlight, consuming vitamin rich foods such as eggs, mushrooms and fish, and supplements to aid our bodies to regulate calcium absorption.

Vitamin D is also thought to be involved in our immune systems and to play roles in multiple types of diseases.

Babies require 400IU of vitamin D, adults 600IU whilst those aged over 50 and pregnant women need a massive 800IU. The ideal way for us to take in Vitamin D would be 90% through sunlight and 10% through food, or an equal 30% to food, sunlight and supplements. However, we actually gain the vitamin via sunlight just 10% of the time, 20% through food, and 20% via supplements, leaving 40% of insufficiency. This insufficiency can lead to headaches, pain, muscle weakness and can ultimately lead to very serious health issues.

Vitamin D is important! Why not get out in the sun and/ or eat some vitamin D rich foods today, and feel healthier!

Vitamin D More Than Just A Vitamin

Thanks & Regards,
Shashi Kumar Aansoo
Author of #InspiringShashi Blog

Living The Best Today

सौजन्य:
“Everything You Need To Know About Vitamin D” http://feedly.com/k/1dFhmpD

The top 10 languages spoken in the world

10. French — Number of speakers: 129 million
Often called the most romantic language in the world, French is spoken in tons of countries, including Belgium, Canada, Rwanda, Cameroon, and Haiti. Oh, and France too. We’re actually very lucky that French is so popular, because without it, we might have been stuck with Dutch Toast, Dutch Fries, and Dutch kissing (ew!).
To say “hello” in French, say “Bonjour” (bone-JOOR).

9. Malay-Indonesian Number of speakers: 159 million
Malay-Indonesian is spoken – surprise – in Malaysia and Indonesia. Actually, we kinda fudged the numbers on this one because there are many dialects of Malay, the most popular of which is Indonesian. But they’re all pretty much based on the same root language, which makes it the ninth most-spoken in the world.Indonesia is a fascinating place; a nation made up of over 13,000 islands it is the sixth most populated country in the world. Malaysia borders on two of the larger parts of Indonesia (including the island of Borneo), and is mostly known for its capital city of Kuala Lumpur.
To say “hello” in Indonesian, say “Selamat pagi” (se-LA-maht PA-gee).

8. Portuguese — Number of speakers: 191 million
Think of Portuguese as the little language that could. In the 12th Century, Portugal won its independence from Spain and expanded all over the world with the help of its famous explorers like Vasco da Gama and Prince Henry the Navigator. (Good thing Henry became a navigator . . . could you imagine if a guy named “Prince Henry the Navigator” became a florist?) Because Portugal got in so early on the exploring game, the language established itself all over the world, especially in Brazil (where it’s the national language), Macau, Angola, Venezuela, and Mozambique.
To say “hello” in Portuguese, say “Bom dia” (bohn DEE-ah).

7. Bengali — Number of speakers: 211 million
In Bangladesh, a country of 120+ million people, just about everybody speaks Bengali. And because Bangladesh is virtually surrounded by India (where the population is growing so fast, just breathing the air can get you pregnant), the number of Bengali speakers in the world is much higher than most people would expect.
To say “hello” in Bengali, say “Ei Je” (EYE-jay).

6. Arabic — Number of speakers: 246 million
Arabic, one of the world’s oldest languages, is spoken in the Middle East, with speakers found in countries such as Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Iraq, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, and Egypt. Furthermore, because Arabic is the language of the Koran, millions of Moslems in other countries speak Arabic as well. So many people have a working knowledge of Arabic, in fact, that in 1974 it was made the sixth official language of the United Nations.
To say “hello” in Arabic, say “Al salaam a’alaykum” (Ahl sah-LAHM ah ah-LAY-koom) .

5. Russian — Number of speakers: 277 million
Mikhail Gorbachev, Boris Yeltsin, and Yakov Smirnoff are among the millions of Russian speakers out there. Sure, we used to think of them as our Commie enemies. Now we think of them as our Commie friends. One of the six languages in the UN, Russian is spoken not only in the Mother Country, but also in Belarus, Kazakhstan, and the U.S. (to name just a few places).
To say “hello” in Russian, say “Zdravstvuite” (ZDRAST-vet- yah).

4. Spanish — Number of speakers: 392 million
Aside from all of those kids who take it in high school, Spanish is spoken in just about every South American and Central American country, not to mention Spain, Cuba, and the U.S. There is a particular interest in Spanish in the U.S., as many English words are borrowed from the language, including: tornado, bonanza, patio, quesadilla, enchilada, and taco grande supreme.
To say “hello” in Spanish, say “Hola” (OH-la).

3. Hindustani — Number of speakers: 497 million
Hindustani is the primary language of India’s crowded population, and it encompasses a huge number of dialects (of which the most commonly spoken is Hindi). While many predict that the population of India will soon surpass that of China, the prominence of English in India prevents Hindustani from surpassing the most popular language in the world. If you’re interested in learning a little Hindi, there’s a very easy way: rent an Indian movie. The film industry in India is the most prolific in the world, making thousands of action/romance/ musicals every year.
To say “hello” in Hindustani, say “Namaste” (Nah-MAH-stay) .

2. English — Number of speakers: 508 million
While English doesn’t have the most speakers, it is the official language of more countries than any other language. Its speakers hail from all around the world, including the U.S., Australia, England, Zimbabwe, the Caribbean, Hong Kong, South Africa, and Canada. We’d tell you more about English, but you probably feel pretty comfortable with the language already. Let’s just move on to the most popular language in the world.
To say “hello” in English, say “What’s up, freak?” (watz-UP-freek) .

1. Mandarin — Number of speakers: 1 billion+
Surprise, surprise, the most widely spoken language on the planet is based in the most populated country on the planet, China. Beating second-place English by a 2 to 1 ratio, but don’t let that lull you into thinking that Mandarin is easy to learn.. Speaking Mandarin can be really tough, because each word can be pronounced in four ways (or “tones”), and a beginner will invariably have trouble distinguishing one tone from another. But if over a billion people could do it, so could you. Try saying hello!
To say “hello” in Mandarin, say “Ni hao” (Nee HaOW). (“Hao” is pronounced as one syllable, but the tone requires that you let your voice drop midway, and then raise it again at the end.)



Word Power Made Easy – I Started Working on it.

After long waiting finaly I purchased and start working it.

My Initial Test is Really Below Average . I need perfect attention and routine and have to stick on that.

I Just Want To Better Control On English.

Fact that hearts -My Podcast

4 d 1st time in d history of mankind “Need”, “Comfort” & “Luxury” r sold @ same price in India! Onions: Rs 65, Petrol: Rs 65 & Beer: Rs 65″

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Create a total life

So, how do you create a total life? Consider the following five key elements

Practice self-development

Self-development is a major theme throughout Drucker’s writings and teachings. “What matters,” he said, “is that the knowledge worker, by the time he or she reaches middle age, has developed and nourished a human being rather than a tax accountant or a hydraulic engineer.” Think about your life, both as it is now and where you’d like to be. Consider not just your work, but also your family, friends, interests, activities, and pursuits. Assess what’s working, what’s not, and what you might want to add or subtract to create more satisfaction and fulfillment.

Identify and develop your unique strengths

The concept of core competencies may have been created for organizations, but today it applies to individuals as well. Drucker urged people to consciously articulate their own strengths. Consider what’s unique about what you do, and in what areas you excel and contribute the most, both at work and outside of work. Focus on those strengths—your own core competencies—and find new ways to value and cultivate them. Odds are you can apply them to a variety of jobs, volunteer positions, and more.

Create a parallel or second career

Drucker said, “The purpose of the work on making the future is not to decide what should be done tomorrow, but what should be done today to have a tomorrow.” One unique idea he advocated was creating a “parallel career” in areas such as teaching, writing, or working in nonprofit organizations. He also encouraged developing a second career, often by doing similar work in a significantly different setting—a lawyer, for instance, might move from a traditional law firm to a legal nonprofit dedicated to a personally meaningful cause. While still in your main job, start thinking about your own possibilities for a parallel or second career. Consider how to match your values, experience, and education, and what shifts you might need to make in your life to support such changes.

Exercise your generosity

An essential part of living in more than one world, Drucker believed, is displaying a sense of generosity. Here, he said, “…everybody is a leader, everybody is responsible, everybody acts.” Sharing your time and talents by getting involved in volunteerism, social entrepreneurship, and mentoring not only provide opportunities to contribute, but also offer personal benefits, from broadening and deepening your life experience to expanding your circle of friends and colleagues. Think about what happens outside your workplace—in other industries, professions, and walks of life—and consider ways you can exercise your own generosity.

Teach and learn

Education plays a key role in Drucker’s vision of a strong, functioning society. He believed that knowledge workers should never stop learning. However, it’s up to them, he said, to incorporate continuous learning as a natural part of daily life— deciding what and how they’d like to learn and determining how they’ll build in the time. Consider your own priorities for learning, as well as how you learn best—taking classes, reading articles and books, asking or observing others, etc. You might also want to teach. As Drucker acknowledged, “No one learns as much as the person who must teach his subject.”

Start Where You Are

Drucker’s tenets can help you create a more satisfying and meaningful personal life and career. Here are seven tips for getting started:

Focus on achievement—not money

Drucker drew an important distinction between achievement and money. He suggested focusing on achievement and paying attention to how your successes, on and off the job, benefit both you and others. That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t or won’t make money, but that the pursuit of money ought to play a subordinate role.

Make time for thinking

Thinking is hard work, and in our fast-paced society, said Drucker, it is sorely devalued. The point, he urged, is to break from the daily grind and think about where you are and where you’re going. You might not have the desire or means

for Drucker’s suggested “week in the wilderness,” but surely you can carve out

an hour now and then for self-reflection. Take a walk, practice yoga or meditation, or enjoy nature.

Practice “systematic abandonment”

“People are effective because they say no…because they say, ‘This isn’t for me,’” declared Drucker. Practice what he called “systematic abandonment”—stepping back, at regular intervals, to determine which of your present activities can be scaled back or eliminated. Only then can you make way for something more fruitful, such as teaching, learning, or volunteering.

Volunteer your time and talent

Drucker saw volunteerism as essential to the smooth functioning of society, as well as a satisfying way of ensuring that work doesn’t consume your life. Today, there are hundreds of volunteering opportunities to choose from. Drucker’s recommendation was simple: Find an organization and cause you believe in—and get to work!

Become a mentor

Mentorship may be broader than just showing someone the ropes in a group or organization. It can include wide-ranging career and life advice, and as Drucker said, provide big benefits not only to the “mentee” but also to the mentor. If you’ve been guided by mentors of your own, pay it forward by mentoring others. If not, look for opportunities to both mentor and be mentored.

Learn the art of leisure

Drucker observed that “loafing” is easy, but “leisure” is difficult. As important as work is, avoid allowing it to be your only source of fulfillment. Find some outside interests; focus on things that may bring you pleasure, satisfaction, and a heightened sense of self-worth.

Be the CEO of your own life

Drucker saw self-management as an ongoing discipline, requiring self-knowledge, introspection, and personal responsibility. “In effect,” he said, “managing oneself demands that each knowledge worker think and behave like a chief executive officer.” Start now to think of yourself as the CEO of your own life and career. Take accountability for your decisions and actions. Know who you are, what is important to you, and how you will contribute at work and in the world.



Finally, take a deep breath and don’t expect everything to happen at once. Start

where you are and move towards your total life, one step at a time.

Thanks for visiting My Blog. Keep Visiting and give your Valuable Comments. Regards, Shashi Kumar Copyright © All rights reserved. http://shashiaansoo.blogspot.com Be Nothing Less Than The Best ™

What Is Respect?

What Is Respect?
Respect means a lot of different things. On a practical level it seems to include taking someone’s feelings, needs, thoughts, ideas, wishes and preferences into consideration. We might also say it means taking all of these seriously and giving them worth and value. In fact, giving someone respect seems similar to valuing them and their thoughts, feelings, etc. It also seems to include acknowledging them, listening to them, being truthful with them, and accepting their individuality and idiosyncrasies.

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Keep Visiting and give your Valuable Comments.

Regards,

Copyright © All rights reserved.

Great Ways to Become Poor and Stay Poor

20090601-poor

Nobody plans to become poor and yet a great many people end up poor. Here are some of the best known ways of ensuring a life of penury:

1. ‘We don’t need no education…’

If you drop out of school or fail to achieve a basic education then you will severely restrict your chances of employment. What is more it is difficult to acquire further skills if you lack the basic ones. However this method does not guarantee poverty as there are some exceptional people who, because of sheer hard work or innate ability, succeed despite little formal education.

2. Develop an addiction.

Addictions are good ways to squander wealth and health. Cocaine and heroin are fast routes to perdition. Gambling works really well too.. The time-honoured choice is alcoholism which has ruined many a career and relationship. Yet there are exceptions. A tiny number of habitual gamblers win, some alcoholics can function for a long time. In the end the addiction usually wins.

3. Never save.

Savings help build wealth so a good plan for long-term poverty is to blow any extra earnings or bonuses on having a good time.

4. Borrow.

Borrowing to buy a house or get a degree can be an investment but borrowing for vacations, cars and general consumption is not very smart. A good way to beome penniless is to max out your credit cards and keep borrowing more until the repayments overwhelm you.

5. Go directly to jail.

A proven way to avoid success is to get involved in crime, particularly early in life, and end up in jail where you can waste the years that could have been spent acquiring an education and useful skills. Petty criminals find it hard to get jobs, build relationships or retain wealth. Of course some criminals end up rich but they risk being eliminated by rivals.

6. Stay in a dead-end low-paid job.

A low-paid job is fine if you really enjoy what you do or if it is a route to something better. But many people hate what they do and earn barely enough money to survive. They are reluctant to take a risk, to learn new skills or to try something new. They stay on a road that leads nowhere.

7. Avoid work altogether.

Some unfortunate people are too ill to work but many able bodied people make a decision to live on benefits and to avoid work. Perhaps they intend to marry a movie star or to win the lottery but working their way up is not part of the plan.

8. Be born in the third world.

If you are one of the millions born in very poor countries with no human rights, no education or healthcare and a repressive regime then you face enormous difficulties in escaping a life of poverty. Some do but the vast majority are condemned to extreme hardship.

If you are fortunate enough to live in a developed country then you need to avoid plans 1 to 7 above and then maybe do something to help those caught in number 8.

Who’s been India’s best and worst PM till date?

In coming few days, India will have a new Prime Minister. It’s as good a time as any to take stock of the men — and one woman — who have served us. Who’s been the best PM India’s had, and who’s done the most damage?
One Question always arrise that Who’s been India’s best and worst PM till date? According to me. The Failure and achievement we had seen in last decade is enough to decide. No doubt about it If we see our Past it is cristel clear that Mrs Indira Gandhi, Mr Rajiv Gandhi & Mr Atal Bihari Vajpayee remarked a wonderful performance except some of blot. Would that Our country did not faced The 1984 Sikh riots and the Bofors scam, the escorting of three terrorists to Kandahar by Jaswant Singh in exchange for hostage and Gujrat Burned. I think only this four Blot changed lots of thing in our country otherwise both Mr Rajiv Gandhi & Mr Atal Bihari Vajpayee are the best PM ever.
And yes…. Mr Manmohan Singh will be considered as India’s weakest most literate PM not due to his polite and humble nature but because of is appearance towards People I think the people of India never felt connected himself to Mr. PM and this is enough to define.
We do not need this time a Showpiece. Now we do not want to be happy with listing Opening Obama Speech we need such type of Leader in our country and this time it seems there are some like Me Rahul, Mr Advani, and yes Mr Modi is the best.
This is my view and I have right to say

Thanks for visiting My Blog.
Keep Visiting and give your Valuable Comments.
Regards,
Shashi Kumar
Copyright © All rights reserved. http://shashiaansoo.blogspot.com Be Nothing Less Than The Best ™

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

Photoshop contest : To imagine what would be left of some of the world’s major landmarks in hundreds of years, once civilization has ended.

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now
Trafalgar Square, London

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

The Palace of Westminster, London

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

Tower Bridge, London

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

The Burj Al Arab, Dubai

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

Hong Kong harbour

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

Sydney Opera House, Australia

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now
The Louvre, Paris, France

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

The Arc de Triomphe in Paris, France

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

Brandenburg Gate, Berlin, Germany

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

The Basilica of Superga, Turin, Italy

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

Giotto’s bell tower in Florence, Italy

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

Times Square, New York City

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

The Brooklyn Bridge, New York City

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

Cinderella Castle, Walt Disney World, Florida, US

Future of our Planet: Artistic impression of a time hundred years from now

Mount Rushmore, South Dakota, US

Incredible Roman Arena of Nimes and its Ancient City

For nearly 2,000 years an imposing Roman amphitheatre has dominated the French city of Nimes — the capital of Gard Department on the edge of Provence — dating back to around 70 A.D. The Arena of Nimes is a testament to the degree of perfection achieved by Roman
engineers in designing and constructing extremely complex buildings such as these, and the best preserved amphitheatre of the Roman era.


The monumental Roman building encloses an elliptical central space of 435 feet (133 meters) long by 330 feet (101 meters) wide, ringed by 34 rows of seats supported by a vaulted construction. It was constructed of stones from two quarries near the town — Barutel and Roquemaillere.

The front of the building consists of 2 levels of 60 over-and-under arches and an attic, separated by a cornice. Massive stones overhang at the top which were drilled to support long poles that suspended a huge canvas over the arena, providing protection for the spectators against the sun and foul weather.



STUNNING


One passes through the terraces to the interior galleries via the arena, opening to an overall view of the architecture and the history of the Nîmes Arena — 34 rows of “cavea” (terraces), which are supported by semi-circular vaults, bearing seating capacity for an audience of 16,300.

Beneath these vaults are 5 circular galleries and 162 stairwells and corridors, leading to the terraces for quick access to spectator seats to watch the games, gladiator fights and Venatio –animal hunts — which were open to everyone.




Inscriptions in stone have revealed that the boatmen of the Rhone and the Saone had seats reserved for their corporation. The lowest terraces were reserved for the town’s dignitaries and important people. The town’s citizens were seated in the intermediary terraces and the ordinary people and slaves viewed the battles from the upper terraces.

The amphitheatre was designed so that all had a clear view of the entire arena. Several galleries were located beneath the arena, accessed by trap doors and a hoist-lift system that provided entrance to the arena for the animals and gladiators during the games.




History of the Arena of Nimes
Prior to the Romans, the Celts established a settlement in Nimes. During the rule of Julius Caesar and Emperor Augustus the city grew in importance.

As the Empire fell, the amphitheater was fortified by the Visigoths and surrounded by a wall. During the turbulent years that followed the collapse of Visigoth power in Hispania and Septimania, not to mention the Muslim invasion and re-conquest by the French kings in the early 18th century, the viscounts of Nimes constructed a fortified palace within the amphitheater.

A small neighborhood later developed within its confines, complete with 100 denizens and 2 chapels. 700 people lived within the amphitheater during the height of its service as an enclosed community.

The buildings remained in the amphitheater until the 18th century, when the decision was made to convert the amphitheater into its present form.

The Arena was once the setting for gladiatorial battles, but today it’s matadors who fascinate their audiences during the Whitsuntide Féria.

Remodeled in 1863 to serve as a bullring, the Arena of Nimes not only hosts 2 annual bullfights, it’s also the scene for other public events such as concerts and operas. Since 1989 it’s had a movable cover and a heating system.




City of Nimes
Nimes — or “Nemausus” as the Romans named their colony — developed into an important center. In the 2nd century A.D. emperors Hadrian and Antonius Pius ordered the construction of 2 further splendid buildings, enriching the town with fine architecture. It was located on the Via Domitia, a Roman road constructed in 118 B.C, connecting Italy to Spain.


The Maison Carrée in Nimes


Pont du Gard from the north bank.

The Temple of Diane.

The city is known for its many well-preserved Roman structures, including:

• The Maison Carrée from the 1st century A.D. built in a Greek style as a temple and now housing a museum of Roman sculpture, and the only completely preserved Roman temple in the world.

• The Pont du Gard from late 1st century B.C. or early 1st century A.D. — a famous aqueduct.

• Near the city is the Tour Magne, a tower likely built in the 1st century B.C.

• The Temple of Diana from the 2nd century A.D.

• Also of note is the Cathedral of Saint Castor which began in the 11th century.

Today the beautiful view from the most highly elevated seats of the Amphitheatre extends across the rooftops of the picturesque old town of Nimes and its 2,000 years of glorious history.


The Porta Augusta.


The Castellum divisorium on the aquaduct.


Les Quais de la Fontaine, the embankments of the spring that provided water for the city,
the first civic gardens of France, were laid out in 1738-55.

The city gets its name from the Nemausus spring in the Roman village. The contemporary symbol and shield of the city of Nimes includes a crocodile chained to a palm tree with the inscription ‘COLNEM,’ an abbreviation of ‘Colonia Nemausus’ — meaning the ‘colony’ or ‘settlement’ of Nemausus.

The hill named Mt. Cavalier was the site of the early oppidum, which gave birth to the city. In the 3rd to 2nd century B.C. a surrounding wall was built, closed at the summit by a dry-stone tower, which was later incorporated into the masonry of The Tour Magne. The Wars of Gaul and the fall of Marseille in 49 B.C. allowed Nimes to regain its autonomy under Rome.

It became a Roman colony some time before 28 B.C, and some years later a sanctuary and other constructions connected with the fountain were raised on the site. Nimes was already under Roman influence, though it was Augustus who made the city the capital of Narbonne province, and gave it all its glory.


Palais de Justice.


Nimes Eglise Ste. Perpétue et Ste. Felicite.

Nimes Eglise Ste. Perpétue et Ste. Felicite.

Augustus gave the town a ring of ramparts 3.7 miles (6 kilometers) long, reinforced by 14 towers, with gates of which 2 remain today — the Porta Augusta and the Porte de France. The city had an estimated population of 60,000.

He had the Forum built, and an aqueduct was built to bring water from the hills to the north. Where this crossed the River Gard between Uzes and Remoulins the spectacular Pont du Gard was built, 12 miles (20 kilometers) northwest of the city.

Veterans of the Roman legions who had served Julius Caesar in his Nile campaigns were given plots of land to cultivate on the plain of Nimes after 15 years of soldiering.

Nothing remains of certain monuments, the existence of which is known from inscriptions or architectural fragments found in the course of excavations. It is known that the town had a civil basilica, a curia, a gymnasium, and perhaps a circus.

Thanks for visiting My Blog. Keep Visiting and give your Valuable Comments.
Regards, Shashi Kumar
Copyright © All rights reserved. http://shashiaansoo.blogspot.com Be Nothing Less Than The Best ™

18 Means for Living Below Your Means

Live Below Your Means

Live a comfortable life, not a wasteful one. Do not spend to impress others. Do not live life trying to fool yourself into thinking wealth is measured in material objects. Manage your money wisely so your money does not manage you. Always live well below your means.(A penny saved is a penny earned. – Benjamin Franklin)

  1. Redefine your definition of “rich”. – “I remember sitting in a cubicle at my first professional job staring at a picture of an SUV I wanted to buy (and eventually did). Now, I sit in my office and look at the pictures of my kids, and just outside my window I can see the beater I drive sitting in the company parking lot. What a difference a decade makes! To sum things up, my definition of being rich is having enough money to meet my family’s basic needs, a few of our wants, and to be able to give some away to others.” – via Frugal Dad
  2. Borrow and share. Everyone wins! – “We borrowed a DVD from a friend instead of renting or buying and had a little snack from our own fridge! Way cheaper than using gas to drive to the theater/rental place, paying for a movie, and paying for a snack.” – via My Dollar Plan
  3. Avoid the mall. – “Going to the mall is not entertainment! We used to go when we were bored. Of course, we usually ended up spending money while we were there. If you need clothes, then shop sales or go to stores that offer name-brands at a discount. You can save a ton on these items if you are a smart shopper. Dave Ramsey says, “Never pay retail!” We probably save $15 to $30 per month by staying away from the mall.” – via My Super-Charged Life
  4. Limit your intake of advertisements. – “Advertising sucks. That’s the cold, hard truth. It’s engineered to make you feel like you’re incomplete, that you have an unfulfilled need, that you’re not good enough.” – via On Simplicity
  5. Buy with cash. – “You can’t spend money you don’t have. Many bank accounts provide overdraft protection, so even with a debit card, it’s easier to go over your account balance than you think.” – via Simple Mom
  6. Find a better deal and actually SAVE the difference. – “Regardless of what they sell, if you’ve switched companies for price reasons, save the difference. Think of phone companies, internet access, cell phones, credit cards, and others.” – via The Wisdom Journal
  7. Adhere to a long-term investment strategy. – “I’m a long-term investor. The stock portion of my portfolio is spread over several mutual funds, a few ETFs and a few inpidual stocks. Each and every one of these holdings was carefully chosen, after thorough research. I believe in these stocks and funds. I consider them as my best bet in growing my money – LONG TERM.” – via MomGrind
  8. Curb your consumerism! – “Have you ever watched how a child can play with a cardboard box for hours, and leave the toy that came in it by the wayside? How is it that children can enjoy themselves without a lot of “stuff”, but we as adults feel the need to reward ourselves by buying more stuff?” – via Billionaire Woman
  9. Stay Healthy! Medical problems drain bank accounts. – “James M. Rippe, M.D is a best-selling author, world-renowned cardiologist, and founder of the Rippe Lifestyle Institute. He explains that if you look at all the risk factors for dying, the one that is most predictive is fitness level. In addition, an older person with high cardiovascular fitness is healthier than a younger person who is physically inactive. By increasing your fitness level, you can actually roll back your biological clock.” – via Abundance Blog
  10. Stay in and relax. – “So, think about it the next time you go out. Are you going for with a purpose? Maybe the solution is to not go out at all. Stay home and save! Save up for something you really want or need.” – via The Jungle of Life
  11. Gradually prepare yourself for a rainy day. – “Even when things are going great, and you feel on top of the world, you must always be prepared for a change. If you take the time and patience to set yourself up properly, then when things to take a turn for the worse, you will be prepared to handle it. If you live above your means, then when the slightest change occurs, you will not be prepared to adapt. Financial flexibility is more important then keeping up with the Jones’.” – via Yin vs. Yang
  12. Stop competing. Forget about the Jones’ altogether. – “If getting rich makes us happy, then why don’t countries as a whole get happier as they grow wealthier? They discovered that as a country gets wealthier there’s no overall increase in happiness. Why? We continually compare our wealth against that of others. We are competitive and envious. Add to that the fact that Western countries encourage people to strive for more and more, and you have a formula that spins many into depression.” – via Color Your Life Happy
  13. Get out of the “easy street” mentality. – “I think there is too much emphasis on the quick fix or the easy option in today’s society. For example taking diet pills to lose weight instead of the “hard option” – exercising and eating well…. money is sometimes being used as a substitute for hard work. Do you think there is an increasing expectation that you can get want you want by throwing money around instead of working hard and “earning” it? – via Forever Change
  14. Avoid impulse buying. Buy things you truly need. – “Don’t you just love the excitement you feel after coming home with a new TV? Driving home in a new car? Opening the box on a new pair of shoes? I sure do. But, from watching the behavior of myself and my friends I’ve found that the new quickly becomes just another item. The excitement of novelty passes quickly.” – via Think Simple Now
  15. Time is money. Properly manage your time. – “The fewer tasks you have, the less you have to do to organize them. Focus only on those tasks that give you the absolute most return on your time investment, and you will become more productive and have less to do. You will need only the simplest tools and system, and you will be much less stressed. I think that’s a winning combination. Focus always on simplifying, reducing, eliminating. And keep your focus on what’s important. Everything else is easy.” – via LifeDev
  16. Find ways to give without spending. – “Want a quick, easy and (almost) free way to be guaranteed that you’ll make someone’s day special? Send them a letter. Why not set aside some time this weekend to sit down and write to a few people? If you don’t enjoy writing, try buying some nice postcards of your home town. If you’ve got an artistic streak, why not design your own note cards? You don’t have to write a long letter for it to be effective. It’s the thought that counts and the personal touch that makes it special.” -via Dumb Little Man
  17. Don’t let greed and deceit get the best of you. – “According to Stephen R. Covey, if you reach an admirable end through the wrong means it will ultimately turn to dust in your hands. This is due to unintended consequences that are not seen or evident at first. The example he gives in The 8th Habit is: The parent who yells at their kids to clean their rooms will accomplish the end of having a clean room. But this very means has the potential to negatively affect relationships, and it is unlikely the room will stay clean when the parent leaves town for a few days. Now, to return to the topic of wealth, I think it is possible to see much of the world’s current financial problems as stemming from people who wrongly believe the ends justify the means. My advice? It is fine to aspire to wealth, but don’t lose sight of the means to accomplishing it.” – via The Change Blog
  18. Never ever pay retail. – “You can easily save hundreds of dollars a year on clothing purchases by waiting for sales or shopping at discount retailers like Marshalls. Better yet, avoid name brand clothing all together.” – via Marc and Angel Hack Life 🙂

Thanks for visiting My Blog. Keep Visiting and give your Valuable Comments.

Regards, Shashi Kumar

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10 Skills You Need to Succeed at Almost Anything

Sent to you by Shashi Kumar Aansoo via Google Reader:

via The Best Article Every day by bspcn on 7/31/08


Written by lifehack

10 SKills You Need to Succeed at Almost Anything

What does it take to succeed? A positive attitude? Well, sure, but that’s hardly enough. The Law of Attraction? The Secret? These ideas might act as spurs to action, but without the action itself, they don’t do much.

Success, however it’s defined, takes action, and taking good and appropriate action takes skills. Some of these skills (not enough, though) are taught in school (not well enough, either), others are taught on the job, and still others we learn from general life experience.

Below is a list of general skills that will help anyone get ahead in practically any field, from running a company to running a gardening club. Of course, there are skills specific to each field as well – but my concern here is with the skills that translate across disciplines, the ones that can be learned by anyone in any position.

1. Public Speaking

The ability to speak clearly, persuasively, and forcefully in front of an audience – whether an audience of 1 or of thousands – is one of the most important skills anyone can develop. People who are effective speakers come across as more comfortable with themselves, more confident, and more attractive to be around. Being able to speak effectively means you can sell anything – products, of course, but also ideas, ideologies, worldviews. And yourself – which means more opportunities for career advancement, bigger clients, or business funding.

2. Writing

Writing well offers many of the same advantages that speaking well offers: good writers are better at selling products, ideas, and themselves than poor writers. Learning to write well involves not just mastery of grammar but the development of the ability to organize one’s thoughts into a coherent form and target it to an audience in the most effective way possible. Given the huge amount of text generated by almost every transaction – from court briefs and legislation running into the thousands of pages to those foot-long receipts you get when you buy gum these days – a person who is a master of the written word can expect doors to open in just about every field.

3. Self-Management

If success depends of effective action, effective action depends on the ability to focus your attention where it is needed most, when it is needed most. Strong organizational skills, effective productivity habits, and a strong sense of discipline are needed to keep yourself on track.

4. Networking

Networking is not only for finding jobs or clients. In an economy dominated by ideas and innovation, networking creates the channel through which ideas flow and in which new ideas are created. A large network, carefully cultivated, ties one into not just a body of people but a body of relationships, and those relationships are more than just the sum of their parts. The interactions those relationships make possible give rise to innovation and creativity – and provide the support to nurture new ideas until they can be realized.

5. Critical Thinking

We are exposed to hundreds, if not thousands, of times more information on a daily basis than our great-grandparents were. Being able to evaluate that information, sort the potentially valuable from the trivial, analyze its relevance and meaning, and relate it to other information is crucial – and woefully under-taught. Good critical thinking skills immediately distinguish you from the mass of people these days.

6. Decision-Making

The bridge that leads from analysis to action is effective decision-making – knowing what to do based on the information available. While not being critical can be dangerous, so too can over-analyzing, or waiting for more information before making a decision. Being able to take in the scene and respond quickly and effectively is what separates the doers from the wannabes.

7. Math

You don’t have to be able to integrate polynomials to be successful. However, the ability to quickly work with figures in your head, to make rough but fairly accurate estimates, and to understand things like compound interest and basic statistics gives you a big lead on most people. All of these skills will help you to analyze data more effectively – and more quickly – and to make better decisions based on it.

8. Research

Nobody can be expected to know everything, or even a tiny fraction of everything. Even within your field, chances are there’s far more that you don’t know than you do know. You don’t have to know everything – but you should be able to quickly and painlessly find out what you need to know. That means learning to use the Internet effectively, learning to use a library, learning to read productively, and learning how to leverage your network of contacts – and what kinds of research are going to work best in any given situation.

9. Relaxation

Stress will not only kill you, it leads to poor decision-making, poor thinking, and poor socialization. So be failing to relax, you knock out at least three of the skills in this list – and really more. Plus, working yourself to death in order to keep up, and not having any time to enjoy the fruits of your work, isn’t really “success”. It’s obsession. Being able to face even the most pressing crises with your wits about you and in the most productive way is possibly the most important thing on this list.

10. Basic Accounting

It is a simple fact in our society that money is necessary. Even the simple pleasures in life, like hugging your child, ultimately need money – or you’re not going to survive to hug for very long. Knowing how to track and record your expenses and income is important just to survive, let alone to thrive. But more than that, the principles of accounting apply more widely to things like tracking the time you spend on a project or determining whether the value of an action outweighs the costs in money, time, and effort. It’s a shame that basic accounting isn’t a required part of the core K-12 curriculum.

What Else?

Surely there are more important skills I’m not thinking of (which is probably why I’m not telling Bill Gates what to do!) – what are they? What have I missed? What lessons have you learned that were key to your successes – and what have you ignored to your peril?

Things you can do from here:

How to just do it

“Just do it.” Three simple words that are simply powerful.
Nike made this phrase famous, but it’s not just a marketing gimmick. All you need is to “just do it” and you will reach a crucial tipping point in which you will go from saying and planning; to doing and proving.
It’s pretty scary to take a plunge into something like “just do it” implies. But here is how you go about it.
Don’t pick a time or day
“Just doing it” shouldn’t be precise; it should come to you out of the blue. There’s no need to pick a day or plan ahead.
Get pissed, get frustrated
I’ll be honest; I’m pissed and frustrated as I write this article right now. But it’s giving me an unbelievable amount of motivation, and even a little adrenaline to go for it.
Instead of fighting, crying, or complaining when you’re frustrated, funnel that energy into focus and action.
Remember that time’s a wastin’
Every month, week, day, hour, and minute you get closer to your end. Nothing will motivate you more to live than death.
Think less, act more
It might be risky, it might get you in trouble, but you must act more than you think. Forget the “what if’s.” F**K all the naysayers and whatever they tell you! Don’t worry if you fail. Don’t think about the money you’ll lose or gain. Be a little stupid and take a lot of action.
Lose these words and phrases
These aren’t real excuses.
“I can’t.”
“I don’t have enough money.”
You don’t need money to take the plunge.
“I don’t have enough time.”
Yes you do! I don’t care how busy you are. You don’t have enough time to wait.
“I don’t know where to start.”
“I don’t know how.”
Start learning. Get your feet wet and you’ll learn along the way.
“Later.”
No, now!
Stop acting like you’re busy
There are a lot of people out there who push papers around and act like they have so many places to go and so much to do. In reality, they’re just avoiding the actions that will get them what they really desire. May be it is because they’re scared or doubtful.
I don’t care who you are; you have time to “just do it” and chase something you want or need. You’ll just have to get less sleep, lose free time, and make lots of other sacrifices.
Know when you’re reaching your tipping point
One of the biggest obstacles keeping people from “just doing it” is not recognizing when they’re about to hit their tipping point.
If you’ve ever found yourself asking, “is this all there is to life?”, then you are closely approaching your tipping point. The same goes if you feel like you’re about to have a nervous breakdown.
You can either succumb to your emotions; or you can stand up, fight, and just go for whatever will make you happy. Once you cross the threshold towards your tipping point, your mind will never be the same and nothing can ever stop you; except yourself.
List what you don’t like about your life
Perhaps it is focusing on negativity a little too much; but grab a piece of paper and write down what you don’t like about your life. May be you don’t have enough money or worse you aren’t happy enough. For those who really want change, it’s enough for them to take the plunge.
Keep in mind:
“Just do it” is much easier said than done. And it should be that way. It separates the people who deserve it from those who don’t.
So what are you waiting for? Get to it! Close your browser window, turn off the tv, put down the book or magazine and get going!
Written by Andrew Galasetti
Thanks for visiting My Blog.
Keep Visiting and give your Valuable Comments.

Regards,
Shashi Kumar