Tag Archives: Good Read

THE BEST & WORST SLEEPING POSITIONS (INFOGRAPHIC)

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THE BEST & WORST SLEEPING POSITIONS (INFOGRAPHIC)

Sleep is a tricky subject. How much should you get? Is it better to sleep on your side or on your stomach? What position makes you more likely to snore?

Thankfully, The Huffington Post put together an infographic detailing the pros and cons of each sleep position. So pay close attention to the tips below!

What’s your favorite way to sleep? Let us know!

Source: HuffPost

Eat That Frog : Six “P” formula

You may have heard of the six “P” formula. It says,

“Proper Prior Planning Prevents Poor Performance.”

I have found a simple truth. The ability to concentrate single-mindedly on your most important task, to do it well and to finish it completely, is the key to great success, achievement, respect, status and happiness in life.

(Moon+ Reader Pro v2.3.2, Eat That Frog)

Posted from WordPress for Android By Shashi Kumar Aansoo

When Procrastination Is a Problem, and How to Fix It

Procrastination is a long word for this quick idea: later.  It’s telling yourself you’ll do things “tomorrow” or “when I feel more like it.”

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Kill The Habits of Procrastinating When Procrastination Is a Problem.

When is putting things off a problem?

Everyone delays or puts things off sometimes, and that’s fine, says Timothy Pychyl, PhD, an associate professor of psychology at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. You might postpone a meeting because of a schedule conflict, or to give yourself time to prepare. Procrastinating becomes a problem only when it hinders your relationships or getting your work done.

For about one in five adults, procrastination is a real, long-lasting problem.

Why we delay

The things people put off tend to be boring, hard, time-consuming, or maybe they lack meaning to us. Or we worry that the results won’t be perfect. When you avoid doing what seems less than pleasant, you get a little mood boost. But this bump doesn’t last. The avoided thing still hangs over you, causing guilt and stress.

The real reasons we procrastinate lie deep within human behavior. We tend to view things in the future as less real or concrete. The later risks of not doing something (or the rewards of getting it done) seem less real, too.

Putting things off is a habit. We’re wired to do what’s easy — in this case, delaying doing something we don’t find pleasant. And habits are hard to break.

How to get a move on

1. Be concrete. Don’t say, “I’ll start the report in the morning.” Say, “I’ll outline just the three main points of the report while I drink my morning coffee, before I look at mail.”

2. Be realistic about your time. We tend to be optimists about the future and think we’ll get more done than we do. Try jotting down all the things you have to do into your datebook. Include tasks like shopping for food, doing laundry, working out. That way when you make a plan to do something, you can get a true sense of what time you’ll have.

3. “Pre-empt that which tempts,” Pychyl says. Shut off all the things that are a click away from distracting you. Social media and texting require little effort, give you a lot of mood reward, and suck time. Make them a reward after you finish.

4. Know and accept that when the time comes to do the task, you won’t want to — and get past that. Just starting, even in the smallest way, creates progress. Then a sense of progress fuels well-being. “It’s an upward spiral,” Pychyl says.

5. Start with the hardest tasks. Willpower is a muscle. You’ll better resist things that distract when you first get started.

6. “Time travel” in your mind’s eye to when the task at hand is done. Think about how good you’ll feel.
Pace yourself. Set aside time to make a little progress every day. College students who had to complete small amounts of work before they could go to the next level did better on tests than those who were given all the study material at once, a 2011 University of Kansas study found.

7. Be kind to yourself.  Praise yourself for taking the first steps. Assure yourself that a “good enough” effort is great, and better than putting things off.

Posted from WordPress for Android By Shashi Kumar Aansoo

Fact you must know About Vitamin ‘D’

Vitamin D does not get enough attention, which may explain why a massive 50 – 90% of us are thought to have a deficiency. Vitamin D is acquired through contact with sunlight, consuming vitamin rich foods such as eggs, mushrooms and fish, and supplements to aid our bodies to regulate calcium absorption.

Vitamin D is also thought to be involved in our immune systems and to play roles in multiple types of diseases.

Babies require 400IU of vitamin D, adults 600IU whilst those aged over 50 and pregnant women need a massive 800IU. The ideal way for us to take in Vitamin D would be 90% through sunlight and 10% through food, or an equal 30% to food, sunlight and supplements. However, we actually gain the vitamin via sunlight just 10% of the time, 20% through food, and 20% via supplements, leaving 40% of insufficiency. This insufficiency can lead to headaches, pain, muscle weakness and can ultimately lead to very serious health issues.

Vitamin D is important! Why not get out in the sun and/ or eat some vitamin D rich foods today, and feel healthier!

Vitamin D More Than Just A Vitamin

Thanks & Regards,
Shashi Kumar Aansoo
Author of #InspiringShashi Blog

Living The Best Today

सौजन्य:
“Everything You Need To Know About Vitamin D” http://feedly.com/k/1dFhmpD

The top 10 languages spoken in the world

10. French — Number of speakers: 129 million
Often called the most romantic language in the world, French is spoken in tons of countries, including Belgium, Canada, Rwanda, Cameroon, and Haiti. Oh, and France too. We’re actually very lucky that French is so popular, because without it, we might have been stuck with Dutch Toast, Dutch Fries, and Dutch kissing (ew!).
To say “hello” in French, say “Bonjour” (bone-JOOR).

9. Malay-Indonesian Number of speakers: 159 million
Malay-Indonesian is spoken – surprise – in Malaysia and Indonesia. Actually, we kinda fudged the numbers on this one because there are many dialects of Malay, the most popular of which is Indonesian. But they’re all pretty much based on the same root language, which makes it the ninth most-spoken in the world.Indonesia is a fascinating place; a nation made up of over 13,000 islands it is the sixth most populated country in the world. Malaysia borders on two of the larger parts of Indonesia (including the island of Borneo), and is mostly known for its capital city of Kuala Lumpur.
To say “hello” in Indonesian, say “Selamat pagi” (se-LA-maht PA-gee).

8. Portuguese — Number of speakers: 191 million
Think of Portuguese as the little language that could. In the 12th Century, Portugal won its independence from Spain and expanded all over the world with the help of its famous explorers like Vasco da Gama and Prince Henry the Navigator. (Good thing Henry became a navigator . . . could you imagine if a guy named “Prince Henry the Navigator” became a florist?) Because Portugal got in so early on the exploring game, the language established itself all over the world, especially in Brazil (where it’s the national language), Macau, Angola, Venezuela, and Mozambique.
To say “hello” in Portuguese, say “Bom dia” (bohn DEE-ah).

7. Bengali — Number of speakers: 211 million
In Bangladesh, a country of 120+ million people, just about everybody speaks Bengali. And because Bangladesh is virtually surrounded by India (where the population is growing so fast, just breathing the air can get you pregnant), the number of Bengali speakers in the world is much higher than most people would expect.
To say “hello” in Bengali, say “Ei Je” (EYE-jay).

6. Arabic — Number of speakers: 246 million
Arabic, one of the world’s oldest languages, is spoken in the Middle East, with speakers found in countries such as Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Iraq, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, and Egypt. Furthermore, because Arabic is the language of the Koran, millions of Moslems in other countries speak Arabic as well. So many people have a working knowledge of Arabic, in fact, that in 1974 it was made the sixth official language of the United Nations.
To say “hello” in Arabic, say “Al salaam a’alaykum” (Ahl sah-LAHM ah ah-LAY-koom) .

5. Russian — Number of speakers: 277 million
Mikhail Gorbachev, Boris Yeltsin, and Yakov Smirnoff are among the millions of Russian speakers out there. Sure, we used to think of them as our Commie enemies. Now we think of them as our Commie friends. One of the six languages in the UN, Russian is spoken not only in the Mother Country, but also in Belarus, Kazakhstan, and the U.S. (to name just a few places).
To say “hello” in Russian, say “Zdravstvuite” (ZDRAST-vet- yah).

4. Spanish — Number of speakers: 392 million
Aside from all of those kids who take it in high school, Spanish is spoken in just about every South American and Central American country, not to mention Spain, Cuba, and the U.S. There is a particular interest in Spanish in the U.S., as many English words are borrowed from the language, including: tornado, bonanza, patio, quesadilla, enchilada, and taco grande supreme.
To say “hello” in Spanish, say “Hola” (OH-la).

3. Hindustani — Number of speakers: 497 million
Hindustani is the primary language of India’s crowded population, and it encompasses a huge number of dialects (of which the most commonly spoken is Hindi). While many predict that the population of India will soon surpass that of China, the prominence of English in India prevents Hindustani from surpassing the most popular language in the world. If you’re interested in learning a little Hindi, there’s a very easy way: rent an Indian movie. The film industry in India is the most prolific in the world, making thousands of action/romance/ musicals every year.
To say “hello” in Hindustani, say “Namaste” (Nah-MAH-stay) .

2. English — Number of speakers: 508 million
While English doesn’t have the most speakers, it is the official language of more countries than any other language. Its speakers hail from all around the world, including the U.S., Australia, England, Zimbabwe, the Caribbean, Hong Kong, South Africa, and Canada. We’d tell you more about English, but you probably feel pretty comfortable with the language already. Let’s just move on to the most popular language in the world.
To say “hello” in English, say “What’s up, freak?” (watz-UP-freek) .

1. Mandarin — Number of speakers: 1 billion+
Surprise, surprise, the most widely spoken language on the planet is based in the most populated country on the planet, China. Beating second-place English by a 2 to 1 ratio, but don’t let that lull you into thinking that Mandarin is easy to learn.. Speaking Mandarin can be really tough, because each word can be pronounced in four ways (or “tones”), and a beginner will invariably have trouble distinguishing one tone from another. But if over a billion people could do it, so could you. Try saying hello!
To say “hello” in Mandarin, say “Ni hao” (Nee HaOW). (“Hao” is pronounced as one syllable, but the tone requires that you let your voice drop midway, and then raise it again at the end.)



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